Sudanese Refugees

img_1593In September 2016, it was reported by BBC that the number of refugees fleeing South Sudan was now over one million.  According to the UNHCR:

“Most of those fleeing South Sudan are women and children. They include survivors of violent attacks, sexual assault, children that have been separated from their parents or travelled alone, the disabled, the elderly and people in need of urgent medical care.”

The UNHCR estimates that five percent of the children are orphaned with no one accompanying them.

Neighboring countries such as Uganda and the DRC  have struggled to house the refugees.

“UNHCR field staff report that new arrivals are camped in schools and churches, while the less fortunate sleep in the open. Refugees lack food and basic household items.”

The UN estimates over $700 million would be needed to adequately care for the Sudanese refugees in Africa.

If the USA is wanting stricter rules on allowing refugees into the country, perhaps it should send funds to help the UN ease the suffering.  Otherwise, the wealthy US is turning away some of the most vulnerable people in the world.

As I mentioned before, the US vetting process for refugees was already strict.  The Washington Post interviewed an immigration official, asking details of the vetting process.  Here is just one portion of it:

“The refugee applicants’ information and fingerprints (also taken by Homeland Security officers) are run through the databases of nine law enforcement, intelligence and security agencies and matched against criminal databases and biographical information such as past visa applications.”

(photo I took from last weekend’s rally to support refugees)

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