Donating to zoos

My local zoo gladly takes donations to help elephants and other animals.  Obviously, monetary donations are accepted, but it is nice to donate items where you can see the animals actually use them.

The zoo elephants enjoy “foraging” for pasta, unsweetened cereals, oats, and unsalted pretzels.  They also like spices and perfumes.  And, if you have large cardboard tubes you want to recycle, they make enjoyable elephant playthings to manipulate and destroy.

Other animals also need supplies – for example, my zoo was thrilled to accept blankets for their primates.

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So, if you are cleaning out your cupboards, house, or garage, ask your zoo if they need anything!

 

 

 

 

More elephants rescued from sea

Last month, an elephant made international headlines for being stranded out to sea and having the Sri Lankan navy rescue it.

This week, two more Sri Lankan wild elephants were at risk of drowning.  From The Guardian:

The navy said the pair of wild elephants were brought ashore on Sunday after a mammoth effort involving navy divers, ropes and a flotilla of boats to tow them back to shallow waters.

Photos showed the elephants in distress, barely keeping their trunks above water in the deep seas about half a mile off the coast of Sri Lanka.

“Having safely guided the two elephants to the shore, they were subsequently released to the Foul Point jungle [in Trincomalee district],” the navy said in a statement. “They were extremely lucky to have been spotted by a patrol craft, which called in several other boats to help with the rescue.”

The two incidents occurring within weeks of each other may seem odd.  Not only that, but a pod of stranded whales had to be rescued in May by the Sri Lankan navy.

The Sri Lankan lagoon waters this year are very shallow, so elephants are crossing them, not always recognizing the danger that lies in the ocean ahead.  The cyclone season was early, and brought the worst rain since the 1970s.  The animals are having trouble adjusting to the extremes in weather, just like us humans.

The value of elephant memories

Interesting recent research shows that elephants memories are very complex.  Older elephants pass down memories and associations to other generations.

For example, researchers now know that elephants can distinguish different human groups by their clothing and voice.  Evidence shows that elephants recognize and fear tribal hunters’ clothing colors, smells, and voice tones but have little interest in farming tribal groups, seeing them as harmless.

The matriarch teaches young elephants what and who to be wary of even when the young elephant has yet to experience it for himself.

From The Guardian:

The idea of elephants as information networks should matter to conservationists, because in this view of the world every elephant killed by humans is a network user or editor lost. With the extinction of elephants, we would also see the extinction of a network of elephant experiences – where the waterholes are; who to befriend and who to avoid; where the grasses come late or early; where the mud holes are plentiful and where the crocodiles are not; why it’s a good idea to avoid men in red garments; when the moon lights the night each month; where dead friends and ancestors let out their last tortured gasps. This is network chatter. It is network traffic. It has value. We are told that elephants matter because they are spectacularly intelligent and charismatic and because they are ecosystem engineers and umbrella species, protecting the wildlife of the region. But, what if they were also worth conserving for the information architecture that their societies utilise?

Seoul Zoo Baby Elephant

Hui-mang, which means “Hope”, is a lucky little one.  The baby elephant fell into water and her mother and grandmother rushed in to rescue her.  The video is from a zoo surveillance camera, and shows another family member in the background pacing with concern.

This video is yet more proof of the social nature of elephants, the importance of familial relationships, and their intelligence.

It is also a good visual of why humans have long felt a kinship with the animals.

Video: YouTube, photcube

 

 

Welcoming orphaned elephant

Video: youtube, elephantnews

The Elephant Nature Park in Thailand is a special place.  They rescue elephants and rehabilitate them from landmine accidents, abusive circus acts, and body-breaking logging work.  The elephant then can live out his or her life in retirement.

Tourists are allowed to observe the elephants, and even can feed or bathe them (the staff are careful to choose elephants who are willing participants).   This park was where I got to meet a variety of elephants during my trip to Thailand in June 2015.

Therefore, I try to keep up with news online about the Elephant Nature Park.  This video of an orphaned elephant being welcomed by the herd made world news this week, and for good reason.  It’s so heartwarming to watch good news!

With summer here (a short season in my city), I will be posting on the blog less – likely once a week – as I will be trying to spend as much time outside during my free time as possible!

 

 

Elephants help rescue effort

An elephant in India hurt his leg and became stuck in swamp waters.  Local villagers have been bringing the wild elephant food.  They have ridden their domestic elephants into the murky water to deliver supplies.  Now a team of rangers and vets have arrived to free the elephant and fix the leg.

One of the most touching aspects of this story is that the domestic elephants showed great compassion for their fallen wild friend.  They intertwined trunks for extended periods of time, an act usually reserved only for friendly family members.

From ABC News:

Indian veterinarians are treating a 10-year-old wild elephant with an injured leg to help it escape from a marshy area where it has been stuck for at least five days.

The state Forest and Environment Ministry said forest rangers are bringing domesticated elephants to help rescue the trapped male elephant in Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary, 40 kilometers (25 miles) east of Gauhati, the capital of Assam state.

Sadly, more elephants are becoming trapped (and often die) in wells or dangerous waters.  This is due to climate change – wild elephants are going into unchartered territory to search for water and food.

 

Do Asian and African elephants get along?

According to an article in Forbes magazine, zoos nowadays are trying to avoid mixing African and Asian elephant populations.

The reason has little to do with personality differences and more to do with health.  African elephants can carry a virus called EEHV without complications, but Asian elephants can die from it.

Asian and African elephants can accept one another and become like family despite their size and personality differences (Asian elephants are smaller, only males have tusks, and both sexes tend to be less into rough housing as their African cousins).

Interestingly, Asian and African elephants have differences in communication sounds/body language, but when placed together, they seem to learn each other’s methods and combine elements of each to communicate successfully with each other.

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Photo taken at my zoo